Author: Melanie Bedner

Landscape Renovation: River Rock

Looking for a mulch alternative? Landscape river rock provides a versatile, as well as, affordable solution.

Or think outside the box! River rock can be introduced into your landscaping for all sorts of purposes, such as:
– Dry creek beds
– Edging
– Erosion prevention
– Pathways and walkways
– Water features

Available in a range of sizes, and neutral in palette, river rock is capable of complimenting any property.

Landscape Renovation: Walking Trail

Come Spring 2020, this neighborhood walking trail will be busy with traffic! ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

Landscape beds welcome pedestrians and cyclists at each entry point to the trail. Varieties of grass, ninebark, boxwood, and viburnum boast year round interest. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Once mature, oak and maple trees will provide cool summer shade, as well as, gorgeous fall foliage.

Light Up Your Landscape

When the sun goes down, your landscape doesn’t need to go dark with it. There are many energy-efficient, attractive options for landscape lighting that can showcase your favorite specimen plants, prized flowerbeds and unique landscaping features even long after dark.

Why We Need Light

Plants don’t need light 24 hours a day, so why is adding light to the landscape so popular? There are many reasons why you should consider adding a nighttime glow to your garden and yard.

  • Entertaining: If you use outdoor space for entertaining, proper lighting can make it a bright, enjoyable area when your guests arrive and keep the party going even after sunset.
  • Safety: The right lighting can help keep you safe when you’re enjoying your yard by illuminating stairs, gates and walkways to minimize the risk of trips or falls.
  • Curb Appeal: Good landscape lighting highlights your home, lighting up not only plants but also stunning garden accents and your house’s amazing architectural features.
  • Holiday Fun: If you have good lighting in place, it will be simple to add extra holiday lighting to your landscape whenever you wish, or to swap out bulbs for fun holiday colors.

Basics of Landscape Lighting

When you’re ready to light up your landscape, you will want to…

  • Mark Boundaries
    Show off the flowing curves or geometry of your flowerbeds and landscape features by using lights to mark different boundaries. You can also light up property lines or show the edges of pathways, decks and driveways to create inviting illumination that will welcome guests to your home.
  • Guide Not Glare
    It is easy to go overboard with landscape lighting, but less can be more when adding a glow to your property. Consider where shadows fall to create a sense of space and texture with your lighting, and use cleverly positioned lights to draw eyes just where you want them.
  • Consider Color
    While you can choose landscape lights in both warm and cool colors depending on the type of lighting you prefer, don’t forget to consider the colors of the plants and structures those lights are highlighting. This will help you create a cohesive, attractive lighting design.
  • Spotlight Specimens
    If you have a stunning specimen plant in your landscape, a favorite piece of yard art or even an unusual architectural feature on your home, use lighting to highlight that detail. Uplighting and spotlights can be useful for showing off your proudest features.
  • Use Ground Level Lights
    Lights set into the ground are often overlooked, but they can be an amazing component of landscape lighting. You can recess lights to help illuminate a pond, pool or other water feature, as well, giving the water a luscious glow after dark.
  • Set a Mood
    The way you light up your landscape will create an evening and nighttime mood for your property. Lights can be positioned to create a dramatic feel, a romantic ambiance or an exciting party atmosphere. You can even opt for different types of lights to change the mood as desired.
  • Avoid Light Pollution
    Too much light, or lights that are poorly positioned, can create light pollution that leaks through windows, lights up unwanted spaces, shines in the eyes of passersby or intrudes on neighbors’ spaces. Check your lighting plan carefully to be sure it is safe and attractive at all times, and consider timers to help control your lights appropriately.

From simple solar lights to spotlights, lanterns, specialty lights and even fun light strands, there are many different ways to light up your landscape and bring a bit of brightness to even the darkest nights.

 

Landscaping the Pond

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So, you’ve just installed a water garden and you’re wondering how to landscape around it without looking like the pond was a mistake or haphazard addition to your yard. A pond looks best if it appears to “belong” in your landscape. Whether your garden has a natural look or a formal style, the secret is to use plants that look right at home at the water’s edge and blend well with your existing landscape.

Getting Started

Lining the margins of the pond with small rocks disguises pond liner edges and gives an informal look to the water garden. A larger boulder actually overhanging the pond is an ideal spot for kids (or you!) to watch fish, frogs and dragonflies. Continue the theme in the surrounding landscape with some groupings of larger rocks, creating additional shelves or niches for an uneven, natural look.

Trees

In general, trees should not overhang the pond, as a water garden needs 5 to 6 hours of sun for aquatic plants to thrive and intrusive roots could damage the liner as trees grow. However, a small specimen tree will give your water garden scale and is a good starting point to the planting surround. Select smaller growing trees such as Japanese Maple, River Birch or low-growing flowering trees like Star Magnolia, Crepe Myrtle or Snowbell (Styrax). Position them slightly back from the pond’s edge in a suitable space for their own growth needs.

Shrubs

Shrubs give the landscape substance as well as flower and foliage interest at different times of the year. For winter color, select some evergreen shrubs like pines, spruces or junipers. A water garden located in the corner of your yard might have a backdrop of taller shrubs and smaller growing ones in the foreground. A more centrally-located water garden should have lower-growing shrubs all around so the pond can be viewed from all sides. Azaleas are a favorite for early spring color.

Perennials & Grasses

Perennials and ornamental grasses form the final layer of landscape. Select perennials that bloom at different times or with interesting foliage for color and texture all season long. Some favorites include Siberian iris, coneflower, rudbeckia and daylilies for sunny areas, with astilbe, hosta and ferns for more shaded locations. Plant perennials in large clumps or flowing drifts for the most impact.

Ornamental grasses are a spectacular addition to the water garden. Where a tall-growing grass is needed, use varieties of Miscanthus, Erianthus and Molinia. Graceful Fountain Grass is attractive planted in large groupings, while vibrantly-colored Japanese Blood Grass forms a dense low-growing mass for foreground plantings.

Finishing Touches

Be sure to create a place in your pond landscape where you can sit and enjoy your water garden – an overhanging rock or strategically placed garden bench can be ideal. Lighting, too, is important to bring your water garden to life at night. Create dramatic effects both by spotlights around the pond and submerged lighting if possible.

With thoughtful landscaping, your pond can be an integral, beautiful part of your landscape and a focal point for stunning landscaping design.

 

© Bedner's Farm and Greenhouse
315 Coleman Road, McDonald, PA 15057
(724) 926-2541

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